Healy Scanlon Law Firm

Death: one big reason behind Chicago medical malpractice lawsuits


In Chicago, Illinois, news pertaining to alleged negligence of health care professionals that leads to serious injuries and deaths continues to surface. The American Journal of Cardiology recently published a review of medical malpractice cases involving interventional cardiology. Medical experts examined 1,441 claims that were processed from 1985 to 2009.

Based on the study, 22 percent of the processed claims resulted in awards for the plaintiffs. The main reason behind those claims is death at 44.1 percent. This data shows that a medical error can cause fatalities in patients. According to a doctor, communication is the key to preventing medical malpractice claims. Lack of communication or informing the patients of the risks involved in an operation is simply more likely to lead directly to litigation.

Still, even if the patient is aware of the risks, doctors should always exercise due care as they perform the surgery or a certain procedure. Failure to do so can make them liable for the injuries or death of a patient. Proving a health care professional's negligence can be quite difficult for family members of the patient who has died as a result of a medical procedure. Fortunately, the plaintiff can find ways to prove the claim.

First and foremost, the family of the victim will need to obtain medical records from the hospital. The family can request these records and have them forwarded to a medical professional who can explain whether negligence was a factor in the death of their loved one.

Subsequently, the family may wish to speak with a legal professional whose expertise falls within Chicago medical malpractice. Most importantly, once the lawsuit is settled, it will bring closure to the entire family that seeks answers following the wrongful death of their loved one.

Source: The Source for Interventional Cardiovascular News and Education, "Study explores malpractice lawsuits stemming from interventional cardiology," Caitlin E. Cox, Sept. 11, 2013

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information
Contact Us Today

Contact the FirmFor a Free Initial Consultation

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy